Sunday, June 9, 2013

Wisconsin Native Perennial Flowers


My Mother and Dad always referred these patches of pretty spring flowers as "wild phlox".  Betsy, a very nice Master Gardener, reminded me that native phlox has five petals.  The invasive look a-likes are known as Dames Rocket and have 4 petals.  These have 4 petals.  It really doesn't matter to me.  I think they are pretty anyway.  Don't you?
Click here to read the Master Gardener article on Dame's Rocket.
Southeastern Wisconsin, June 2013
(Source:  Photo by Jackie Nelson.  Copyright 2013.  All Rights Reserved)

Southeastern Wisconsin, June 2013
(Source:  Photo by Jackie Nelson.  Copyright 2013.  All Rights Reserved)

Southeastern Wisconsin, June 2013
(Source:  Photo by Jackie Nelson.  Copyright 2013.  All Rights Reserved)

Wild Woodland Flowering Shrub, Southeastern Wisconsin, June 2013
(Source:  Photo by Jackie Nelson.  Copyright 2013.  All Rights Reserved)

I call these Buttercups and do not know the real name but I found them in our woods and thought they were pretty.
Southeastern Wisconsin, June 2013
(Source:  Photo by Jackie Nelson.  Copyright 2013.  All Rights Reserved)

A storm blew in from the west one evening and I caught this photo as the clouds rumbled.  Reminded me of the movie The Ten Commandments.   The storm produced some rain and I something I am most grateful - little wind.
Southeastern Wisconsin
(Source:  Photo by Jackie Nelson.  Copyright 2013.  All Rights Reserved)
  
 
 
Jackie's Garden Report
video
(Source:  Video by Jackie Nelson)
 
Mother Nature brings us a beautiful colorful spring, and I'm happy to share it with you.
 
Wisconsin's native perennial called Dame's Rocket can be found in full bloom between late May until Mid-June.  They are often mistaken for the 5-petal phlox.  We have large plots of these flowers at the farm that have reseeded themselves for years and years.  The result is clumps of beautiful spring lavender color displayed for several weeks.  The plants thrive along our creek banks and the edge of woods where sun reaches the plant and the soil tends to be rich and moist with organic covering.
This plant is fragrant enough to notice when you walk past, an especially nice treat.
 
 
Jack-in-the-Pulpit Wisconsin Native Perennial plant.
(Source:  Photo by Jackie Nelson.  Copyright 2013.  All Rights Reserved)
 
The Jack-in-the-Pulpit plant above, is one of the most unusual woodland native perennials spring plants in our woods.  I always make a point of showing visitors when I take them for a walk on our nature trails because the "jack-in-the-pulpit" is hidden underneath a canopy of top leaves, and unless you look for it, you will miss this lovely plant.  It grows in abundance in our woods in rich moist organic soil in the shady areas.  Left undisturbed for years, this plant thrives in this natural habitat.
 
 
 

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